Army Prosecutors and Fort Hood PAO Play Up The Beard Issue – Just Part of Their Show Trial

Local media report that Army prosuectors evinced disdain toward the Defendant at the pretrial hearing.  Of course, these are the same prosecutors who have allowed the Defendant’s pretrial rights to be violated while in confinement at the Bell County Jail.   Let’s not forget – they still have him defecating in a trash can.  And more recently, his mail privileges have been impermissibly curtailed.

http://usnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/06/08/12126553-nidal-hasan-sports-beard-causing-judge-in-fort-hood-shooting-to-delay-hearing?lite

Hasan Defense Hassled In Court . . . .. Or Was It Just a Set-Up?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: June 8, 2012 12:28:24 PM CDT

Military judge delays pre-trial motions in Major Hasan case

FORT HOOD, Texas (June 8, 2012) — In the case of U.S. vs. Maj. Nidal Hasan, the trial judge, Col. Gregory Gross, delayed pre-trial motions in the Lawrence J. Williams Judicial Center here.

The military judge stated on the record that the accused appeared in court with a beard in violation of Army Regulation 670-1 and Rules for Court-Martial 804(e)(1).  The military judge stated that the appearance of the accused was a disruption to the court proceedings.  As a result, the military judge delayed pre-trial motions until the near future, when either a closed circuit feed can be set up for the accused to watch the hearings from outside the court room or the accused complies with court order to appear with proper military grooming standards.

Defense indicated their intent to file a request for exception to policy for religious accommodation to a higher command.

The motions scheduled for today, to include a new request for a further continuance, resolution of discovery matters and whether the accused should receive at government expense the expert services of a neurologist were delayed until the next Article 39a hearing.

The accused is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law.

For more information contact:

Fort Hood Public Affairs Office
Media Relations
(254) 287-9993
(254) 287-0106
fax: (254) 288-2750
Fort Hood, TX 76522
query@forthoodpresscenter.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: June 8, 2012 12:28:24 PM CDT

Military judge delays pre-trial motions in Major Hasan case

FORT HOOD, Texas (June 8, 2012) — In the case of U.S. vs. Maj. Nidal Hasan, the trial judge, Col. Gregory Gross, delayed pre-trial motions in the Lawrence J. Williams Judicial Center here.

The military judge stated on the record that the accused appeared in court with a beard in violation of Army Regulation 670-1 and Rules for Court-Martial 804(e)(1).  The military judge stated that the appearance of the accused was a disruption to the court proceedings.  As a result, the military judge delayed pre-trial motions until the near future, when either a closed circuit feed can be set up for the accused to watch the hearings from outside the court room or the accused complies with court order to appear with proper military grooming standards.

Defense indicated their intent to file a request for exception to policy for religious accommodation to a higher command.

The motions scheduled for today, to include a new request for a further continuance, resolution of discovery matters and whether the accused should receive at government expense the expert services of a neurologist were delayed until the next Article 39a hearing.

The accused is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law.

For more information contact:

Fort Hood Public Affairs Office
Media Relations
(254) 287-9993
(254) 287-0106
fax: (254) 288-2750
Fort Hood, TX 76522
query@forthoodpresscenter.com

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: June 8, 2012 12:28:24 PM CDT

Military judge delays pre-trial motions in Major Hasan case

FORT HOOD, Texas (June 8, 2012) — In the case of U.S. vs. Maj. Nidal Hasan, the trial judge, Col. Gregory Gross, delayed pre-trial motions in the Lawrence J. Williams Judicial Center here.

The military judge stated on the record that the accused appeared in court with a beard in violation of Army Regulation 670-1 and Rules for Court-Martial 804(e)(1).  The military judge stated that the appearance of the accused was a disruption to the court proceedings.  As a result, the military judge delayed pre-trial motions until the near future, when either a closed circuit feed can be set up for the accused to watch the hearings from outside the court room or the accused complies with court order to appear with proper military grooming standards.

Defense indicated their intent to file a request for exception to policy for religious accommodation to a higher command.

The motions scheduled for today, to include a new request for a further continuance, resolution of discovery matters and whether the accused should receive at government expense the expert services of a neurologist were delayed until the next Article 39a hearing.

The accused is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law.

For more information contact:

Fort Hood Public Affairs Office
Media Relations
(254) 287-9993
(254) 287-0106
fax: (254) 288-2750
Fort Hood, TX 76522
query@forthoodpresscenter.com

Ft Hood PAO Finally Announces The Hasan Pretrial Hearing

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

DATE: June 6, 2012 11:54:49 AM CDT

Military judge schedules next pre-trial hearing for Major Hasan case

FORT HOOD, Texas — The military judge in the case of United States vs. Maj. Nidal M. Hasan has scheduled a half-day administrative hearing at 10 a.m. June 8 in the Lawrence J. Williams Judicial Center here.

Both the prosecution and defense will go on the record in open court to litigate pending motions and discuss administrative matters.  Pending motions before the court include the resolution of discovery matters and whether the accused should receive at government expense the expert services of a neurologist.  Other matters may also be filed for litigation at the hearing.

The accused is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law.

Media who plan to cover the hearing must register

On the date for the event, satellite trucks should report to the Fort Hood Clarke Road Gate on West Highway 190 at 6:15 a.m. Truck registration ends at 6:45 a.m. All others should check in to the Fort Hood visitor’s center, from 8-9 a.m. for final registration. All media should be prepared to show a U.S. driver’s license with photo and an accredited press badge with photo.

For more information contact:

Fort Hood Public Affairs Office
Media Relations
(254) 287-9993
(254) 287-0106
fax: (254) 288-2750
Fort Hood, TX 76522
query@forthoodpresscenter.com

View this document online
US Army – Fort Hood
Fort Hood Press Center

 

Drone Happy President . . . .

The quickening pace of the U.S. drone campaign in Yemen this year has raised new questions about who is being targeted and why. A review of strikes there so far suggests that the Obama administration has embraced a broader definition of what constitutes a terrorism threat that warrants a lethal response.

For more info: click here – http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/us-drone-targets-in-yemen-raise-questions/2012/06/02/gJQAP0jz9U_story.html

Mitt Romney On The Death Penalty – Just Mumbo Jumbo????

“From my perspective, there are two main camps when it comes to the death penalty. On one side, there are some people who believe there are certain crimes that are so offensive… so reprehensible…. so far beyond the bounds of civilized society that they demand the ultimate punishment. In the other camp are well-meaning people who believe that it is immoral for government to ever take a life. In the middle, I believe, are others who could support the death penalty if it is narrowly applied and contains the appropriate safeguards. It is with that group in mind that we have brought forward the death penalty bill before you today…
The appropriate response of society to terrorism carried out around the world or within the Commonwealth’s borders is to apply the death penalty. That is why the legislation I filed in April accounts for terrorism, along with a small number of other crimes, including the assassination of a law enforcement officer, judge, juror or prosecutor, for the purpose of obstructing an ongoing criminal proceeding. My legislation would also allow juries to consider the death penalty in cases that involve prolonged torture or multiple murders, as well as cases in which the defendant has already been convicted of first-degree murder or is serving a life sentence without parole.”

July 14, 2005, Death Penalty Testimony of Governor Mitt Romney to the Massachusetts House of Representatives, in support of his April 28, 2005 filing of a death penalty bill that was ultimately rejected by the legislature.

A Must Read For Those Who Think The Death Penalty Brings Closure

On April 19, 1995, Timothy McVeigh detonated a two-ton truck bomb that felled the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people. On June 11, 2001, an unprecedented 242 witnesses watched him die by lethal injection. In the aftermath of the bombings, American public commentary almost immediately turned to “closure” rhetoric, speculating about whether victim’s family members and survivors could get closure from memorial services, funerals, trials, and executions. But what does “closure” really mean for those who survive—or lose loved ones in—traumatic acts?

In Killing McVeigh, Jody Lyneé Madeira uses the Oklahoma City Bombing as a case study to explore how family members and other survivors come to terms with mass murder. As the fullest case study to date of the Oklahoma City Bombing survivors’ and family members’ struggle for justice and the first-ever case study of execution and closure, this book describes the profound human and institutional impacts of these labors to demonstrate the importance of understanding what closure really is before naively asserting it can or has been reached.

Anybody Know The Status Of the Loving Case???

Loving, a former Army private first class at Fort Hood, Texas, was convicted in 1989 of two counts of premeditated murder, two counts of robbery and other felonies. Loving was charged with murdering two taxicab drivers. One of the taxi drivers was Private Christopher Fay, an active duty Army solider stationed at Fort Hood. The other victim was retired Army Sergeant Bobby Sharbino. Loving gave an undisputed videotaped confession.  Loving is Black and unofficial word is that his case is awaiting Presidential action on the Death Penalty.

 

http://www.chron.com/default/article/U-S-military-may-resume-capital-punishment-1942819.php